NOT Off Jefferson Notch Road

Sometimes the iPhone’s GPS isn’t that accurate and you realize the next day you likely spent the night illegally camping on someone’s property that just happened to have a splendid view.

Oops. ๐Ÿ˜€

Presidential Range
Perfect spot to park the Subaru for the night.

Mount Washington

As I had hiked the Presidential Range many moons ago, I knew I wanted to go back but given the time of year, I figured the hiking trails would be crowded so I opted to pay $31.00 for the privilege of driving up the Mount Washington Auto road accompanied by a guided tour provided on a CD.

The views were incredible, the tourists were obnoxious but I successfully navigated the 7.6-mile guardrail-less road with claim of being America’s 1st man-made attraction.

Another safe and memorable trip made possible by my Subaru Forester. ๐Ÿ˜€

Granger in the front, Zoe and Aslan in back – atop Mount Washington.

Life Is a Highway

I drove us to the top of Mount Washington, a rather unique experience. Sections reminded me of navigating the mountains of Afghanistan as there are no guardrails, the road is just wide enough to allow two-way traffic along with scenic vistas and incredible drop-offs.

Although I met no herds of sheep, a couple of true asses made both ascending and descending less than stellar.

โ€œLife’s like a road that you travel on, when thereโ€™s one day here and the next day gone.
Sometimes you bend and sometimes you stand. Sometimes you stand with your back to the wind.โ€
– Life Is a Highway, Tom Cochrane

Mount Washington Auto Road

Squirrel Pond

After experiencing no small number of deer flies and mosquitoes, the game plan was to spend one night at Squirrel Pond in the North Maine Woods to see if we could tolerate the beasts.

I was pleasantly surprised to find the campsite was the least insect-ridden we had experienced and for a while, it seemed like it was going to be a perfect spot to stay for several nights.

BUT, it turned out I wasn’t paying attention to what the constant change was doing to Zoe and Aslan who are not yet 3 years old. While Granger has gathered quite a bit of experience over his ten years of living with me and is fairly adaptable, the siblings “know” only the sliver of the Sleepy Creek Wildlife Management Area where they had been exploring since puppyhood.

During one of our walks the morning we left, Zoe literally catapulted backwards out of the weeds she was investigating and ran to my side where she remained plastered for several moments.

I saw nothing but I suspect she encountered a moose as I believe I would have smelled a bear. Besides, all of them had seen a bear while living in WV.

Later, it became obvious Aslan was on heightened alert status and could not settle down, sniffing the weeds and returning to my side repeatedly.

They were obviously scared so I made the decision to load up and head on up the road because I didn’t think they would be able to settle down for the night.

Judging by Aslan’s crawling into my lap while I was driving back to the main road, whatever they were sensing was potent. My 65-pound, lanky Doberman was reduced to a quivering mass.

Squirrel Pond, before anxiety wafted through the area.

Abandoned House

Given the harshness of Canada’s winter, especially along the coast, I can only imagine the tales the former occupants of this house could tell.

But what a beautiful location during the milder months.

Deer Island, New Brunswick, Canada

Table Decorations

Some traditions are meant to continue, such as having an appropriate table top decoration at mealtimes.

Aslan takes the tradition seriously. ๐Ÿ˜€

“Itโ€™s not what we have in life, but who we have in our life that matters.”
โ€“ J.M. Laurence

Aslan

Head Harbour Lightstation

“During the Napoleonic Wars, when Britain and the United States were at economic war, the town of Eastport, Maine grew rapidly as a smuggling center. Campobello Island, on which Head Harbour Lighthouse was built (part of New Brunswick, but only 12 km away from Maine’s coast), also became a trade center. During the 1820s, trade flourished and traffic grew between Campobello Island and the Maine Coast. Fishing, shipping, and shipbuilding were very important activities in Passamaquoddy Bay, but the famous Fundy fogs, high tides, and treacherous rocks around Campobello Island bit into the profits and hearts of seafaring traders. Head Harbour’s light was the first Canadian response to this danger, built to warn sailors approaching the craggy rocks and shoals around Campobello Island. Former American President Franklin D. Roosevelt spent his childhood summers and contracted polio on Campobello Island.”
– http://www.campobello.com/lighthouse/litehistory.html

I had no idea.

Head Harbour Lighthouse, Campobello Island, New Brunswick, Canada

Mill Cove

Before heading over to Deer Island, I visited the Head Harbour Lightstation on Campobello Island. On my way out, I asked the (young) park attendants where I could take the dogs so they could run off-leash.

Mill Cove was their suggestion and it was just perfect for Granger, Aslan, and Zoe to stretch their legs and do a bit of wading before we boarded the ferry.

Mill Cove, Lubec, Maine

West Quoddy Head Lighthouse

According to Wikipedia, “West Quoddy Head, in Quoddy Head State Park, Lubec, Maine, is the easternmost point of the contiguous United States. Since 1808, there has been a lighthouse there to guide ships through the Quoddy Narrows. The current one, with distinctive red-and-white stripes, was built in 1858, and is an active aid to navigation.”

I joined a small group for a tour to the top where one can experience a bit of claustrophobia. ๐Ÿ˜€

Lighthouse at West Quoddy Head, Lubec, Maine